Daniel Richards

Daniel is the voice of international TV & radio campaigns, corporate films, trailers, videogames, audio books and news & sports programs, heard across the world.

He also runs “networks Europe”, a global, multi-language team of translators, transcreators, copywriters, localisation professionals, voice talents, audio producers, musicians, composers and sound designers.

To find out more about Daniel check out his website, http://danielrichards.tv/ or www.networkseurope.net

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You’ll also find us on the web at theproaudiosuite.com

The Pro Audio Suite Podcast copyright George Whittam, Andrew Peters, Robert Marshall & Darren Robertson.

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Check out this episode!

this is a test of the emergency
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[Music]
00:31
now let’s get on with the show from Los
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Angeles George Wickham from Chicago
00:36
Robert Marshall from Sydney Australia
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Rob oh and from sunny Melbourne and
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repeaters this is the pro audio suite
00:46
welcome to another pro audio suite
00:49
this week we’re definitely global our
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special guest is based in Milan in Italy
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he runs a studio called networks Europe
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his name is Daniel Richards good morning
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to you good morning to you lovely to
01:02
talk to you when Sasha we’re all over
01:04
the place because Robert is it’s almost
01:07
night time for Robert in Chicago and
01:09
it’s afternoon for Rob oh and I in
01:11
Australia hmm just had my leftover
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Chinese for lunch
01:15
off to you and that does not bode well
01:19
we better get this show over and done
01:20
with pretty quickly yes
01:26
that’s nasty now I’m curious because
01:30
obviously I’ve worked with you Daniel so
01:33
we’ve talked to each other you know
01:35
on several occasions but I’ve never
01:37
asked you the question how did you end
01:38
up in Milan right well I was in a very
01:45
small theatre company in the UK in the
01:48
southwest of England Exeter area in the
01:52
early 1980s and I was running a
01:57
community theater but we also have what
01:59
was then called an alternative comedy
02:02
duo I was in an alternative comedy
02:04
viewer called human cartoon and we used
02:10
to support some of the new comedians so
02:12
it came down to the southwest of England
02:13
from London and one of them was a guy
02:15
called Ben Elton and enough yeah yeah
02:18
there’s over him pretty miss Hayne oh
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great okay there you go
02:23
and he’d asked us to go up to London and
02:27
support him in a gig and and go onto at
02:29
least to do a test for what was then the
02:32
The Comedy Store and for some
02:34
preposterous reason we decided not to
02:36
and stay faithful to the community and
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then I kind of thought well hang on a
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minute
02:42
I’m not quite sure if this is really the
02:44
right decision let me just
02:45
take a couple of weeks off to think
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about this and I just happen to come
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over to Italy to do my thinking and I’m
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still here 35 years later still thinking
02:55
as I decide what to do with my life no
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that’s just kidding but I mean yeah
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that’s how it happened I mean it just
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came over for a break and then got into
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a bit of voice recording over here
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started teaching a university over here
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and then opened up my studio and and so
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on so I mean it literally was on and it
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I’m still on an extended holiday
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basically so your background was not
03:20
necessarily voiceover it was comedy yeah
03:22
very early on I mean I was 22 when I
03:26
came over here so um and the comedy kind
03:30
of got hit and you know hit the comedy
03:31
on the head at that point because being
03:34
at that time to be honest being English
03:36
in Italy was really quite a novelty for
03:41
the Italians English are you from there
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were not that many foreigners around so
03:49
the comedy you know the the performing
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part there wasn’t an audience basically
03:54
so that fell by the wayside but the
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voiceover work that I started that
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pretty much immediately I got here
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obviously 1980s early 1980s no ISDN no
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Internet you know only if you wanted to
04:11
record something in English you had to
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have the person right there or send a
04:14
letter pretty much to somebody or a fax
04:17
they existed to the studio in somewhere
04:19
else and get them to do it or fly over
04:22
and do the session yourself so well
04:24
having an English person here in Milan
04:27
that was willing to sort of go to
04:30
different studios throughout the day and
04:32
do all do their stuff in English for
04:34
them was it was was good for everybody
04:36
and and they really I was pretty much in
04:41
the early 80s I think there were two or
04:43
three of us doing it I made my little
04:46
cassette tape demo in a small studio and
04:50
the next day basically went around
04:53
knocking on doors got the Yellow Pages
04:54
out talking 1980
04:57
384 got the yellow pages out and went
04:59
around knocking on doors and when a week
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later I was a voice talent phone-sized
05:04
how many how much work was there and
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what was the main work was it to
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translation work or was it term stuff
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for these K yeah now it’s very much what
05:13
it still is today what you and I do our
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regular kind of bread-and-butter stuff I
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mean lots of corporate videos in English
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whether for the international fairs you
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know product videos that company history
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demo videos of how products worked and
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what’s quite interesting I mean whatever
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is interesting what happened is a lot of
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these smaller companies that is because
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Italy produces a hell of a lot of stuff
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it really and and the the area above
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Milan the third tech and for furniture
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making and then of course fashion Lehman
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on itself and their electronics and
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civil engineering companies and there’s
05:55
a there’s a company that makes a fader
05:58
system for pro tools similar to slate in
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Italy too I think they’re called like
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devil devil something yeah I mean I had
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hundreds of names in my address book and
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I used to get in the car and drive out
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to some godforsaken part of of the
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country’s light above Milan and go into
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a factory where they’d have a not a
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professional booth but you know as one
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of somebody had made their film and
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there was a kind of microphone in a
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small room not necessarily professional
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microphone either and you just record
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your the commentary to the corporate
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film and off you go take me about two
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hours to get there and you know the
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films used to be so long in those days
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there was just no idea that you know
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it’s best to get it over and done
06:50
placing everything between four and ten
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minutes things used to be like 40
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minutes long with huge you know really
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long shots of factory machinery working
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and and so on so I mean syncing it all
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up and getting it getting it right a
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plus the fact that in I mean
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the company cat used to do the
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translations so I mean it normally took
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me a couple of hours to work out what
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they were trying to say put it into
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semi-decent English as he’s much better
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than than they’d given me and then go
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and record it so it was quite a long and
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painstaking process you know I’m talking
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about the early 80s so things have
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improved hugely since then also under
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sort of translation and sensitivity to
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the need to communicate well in the
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language that you’re trying to
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communicate in that but that has
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improved vastly but in those days you
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know it was actually well my my son is
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yeah it’s good English he translated it
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more whatever and it was difficult to to
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tell them but yeah you needed two hours
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to go away and just rewrite the whole
07:57
thing I think we both experienced that
07:59
recently well we did yeah yeah you’re
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right but and again I repeat it’s um
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it’s much much much better than it used
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to be yeah when did you set up your
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studio I set it up in the late 80s and I
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think the foot we actually opened in 18
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in 1990 yeah people would always ask me
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have you got a French German Spanish
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colleague and then it started going a
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bit further afield and you know and it
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just seemed the right thing to do
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finally set something up and be able to
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record myself and and have other foreign
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language voice talents and come in and
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do the stuff so yeah I mean we’ve always
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been known since then as a localization
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hub basically I’m still trying to
08:51
convince our Italian clients that we can
08:54
also do Italian he has 350 Italian voice
08:58
talents on our on our books and we do
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actually know we do much more but our
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real sort of reputa locally our
09:04
reputation has been for obviously for
09:06
localization as and and rightly so I
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mean that’s how it that’s how it started
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so do you see do you see networks is
09:13
also a casting service as well as the
09:15
studio almost definitely yeah yeah I
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mean we do send castings pretty much
09:21
every day in lots of different languages
09:23
and that has been a sort of process of
09:26
selection that’s been going on for four
09:28
decades obviously now it’s much much
09:30
simpler to find voice talents with with
09:35
all the different services that there
09:36
are out there from voice 23 invoices
09:39
calm and and so on and so on and so on
09:41
and also country-specific casting
09:46
services on websites but obviously the
09:49
experience in whittling down the the
09:52
masses to those four three four five six
09:56
voices that will fit the bill for
09:57
whatever you’re trying to or your
09:59
clients are trying to cast that still
10:01
takes experience I think so yes we do
10:04
that and we have several thousand on our
10:07
own database and then we’re always
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convene a constantly expanding it by
10:11
jings Danny but I’ve just said you know
10:14
going on to the science going to new
10:16
Studios which is how we found you I’d
10:20
better leave yeah
10:22
so now you’ve got quite a few studios
10:24
that networks when did you start to
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expand what did you start off small and
10:27
grow or as it always been kind of
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sizable are they are they in the same
10:31
facility or the they are on the same
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facility yeah yeah ya know we started
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off with one in a lovely little
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apartment overlooking what the park that
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leads to thee to the duomo to that two
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mañana’s Cathedral so we had a great
10:47
view and it was literally it wasn’t it
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was a two-bedroom apartment we didn’t
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have any beds in it obviously converted
10:54
into into office space and studios so
10:57
yeah we started off as one then that
11:00
became two and then we converted the
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most miniscule kitchen in the history of
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kitchens into a little booths and I used
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to be able to record myself in there and
11:13
I must have waited quite a few links
11:14
with the with the states and other
11:16
countries in there so then we had three
11:19
and it was kind of pretty ridiculous
11:21
tiny apartment with three Studios a hit
11:24
so a certain point we decided to get a
11:27
bit more serious on me it came to this
11:29
vicinity where we are now where we have
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we have five studios which is which is
11:36
great it gives us just that
11:37
a little bit more play so yeah and I
11:41
would say 90% of the stuff we do is
11:44
linking with people on yourself yes so
11:48
um yeah and we can wait at times when
11:52
you’re doing the localization do you
11:53
find that you’re doing a lot of
11:54
recording remotely with picture sync or
11:57
do you just do wild records and cut
11:59
things in kind of 50/50 a lot of the
12:03
time okay as we do a lot of e-learning
12:06
as well so longer videos and it doesn’t
12:14
need the same degree of of sync as a
12:19
maybe a corporate film although actually
12:22
it does come to think of it but anyway
12:23
it’s long so there we very often if the
12:28
voice talent on the other end
12:29
understands the source language which
12:33
okay for us is Italian but then it often
12:34
gets done first into English so if our
12:37
German French or whatever person is
12:39
happy to have the English in their
12:42
headphones and just go over and go over
12:45
it with a one or two second delay then
12:48
we do that there’s no need to actually
12:50
really send them you know detailed
12:52
videos of screws going into holes or
12:55
tractors came down the field kind of
12:58
thing right ever it is so English
13:00
becomes like a common like like you do
13:03
that translation the first helps the
13:04
other translation yes exactly yeah yeah
13:07
that’s one way we do it although
13:08
obviously for the for other stuff I mean
13:11
for example a series of stuff for
13:15
MasterChef with Joe Bastianich who the
13:18
Americans may know he’s actually half
13:21
Italian and for the Italian version of
13:24
MasterChef he dubs himself into Italian
13:27
so yeah
13:29
those obviously we sent him himself in
13:34
the in the US a version of MasterChef
13:37
and he he went over in Italian we’ve
13:39
done films for sky and and send him
13:43
sending the video across and all the ads
13:46
we do we send the video across I think
13:48
you’ve got
13:50
got now in the States San Pellegrino is
13:53
in the States right now new campaign
13:58
aqua Panna is is is out now and all of
14:01
that stuff we did from here with the
14:04
video again it obviously it depends
14:06
because if it’s a one-liner yeah we can
14:10
do it once with the video they can see
14:12
it and then we’ll just go wild and put
14:14
it on afterwards are the translations
14:16
done do you handle the translations as
14:19
well or do you we do that you do yeah
14:22
yeah yeah we do the translations
14:24
sometimes depending on the client and
14:27
depending on the job we have a sort of a
14:32
trends creation as its trend early
14:34
called service now so we can we offer
14:40
the translation of the of the copy as
14:42
well all transcreation do you find that
14:45
you have to find translators that are
14:46
sort of aware of issues like timing and
14:51
how to make the spirit of the copy work
14:55
when there’s timing issues or maybe even
14:57
some sort of cultural thing absolutely
15:01
yeah absolutely
15:03
yeah yeah like different than the
15:05
translator they would just translate
15:07
show a text book for example absolutely
15:10
yeah for sure
15:12
timing for sure although it’s normally
15:16
not that dramatic but certainly the
15:21
phrasing the the same register in the
15:24
foreign language and not as you say
15:26
necessarily at all the same words and
15:29
that becomes quite tricky sometimes
15:30
because obviously you’re the client may
15:32
not understand then you register and may
15:35
even not very much like the fact that
15:37
his or her words have been quite so
15:40
obviously changed so that’s the art of
15:43
persuasion probably the other thing you
15:48
run into and I know when we do for
15:51
instance you know we start with an
15:52
English say industrial video about
15:55
whatever some product and printer and
15:57
and then we have to do the Spanish
15:59
version and of course the big battle
16:01
there is that
16:03
the Spanish is longer absolutely is
16:05
trying to fit things in and but I
16:07
imagine when you’re going from say
16:10
Italian to English for their trade shows
16:13
they are you’re finding yourself with
16:16
space ma right yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah
16:20
I mean obviously one can try to add a
16:23
tiny bit if that becomes dramatic it’s
16:26
not normally that that much of a problem
16:27
for German going into German from
16:30
English or into Arabic that can become
16:33
quite dramatic so at that point
16:36
especially if it’s an industrial videos
16:38
you said or even even an e-learning
16:40
video which maybe has been edited quite
16:43
tightly in the original language then we
16:45
really have to say can we please have
16:47
the license to cut content you have to
16:53
give the translator something in very
16:57
plain English let’s say and also get the
17:01
scissors out in terms of content with
17:04
discretion of course but the experience
17:06
going along the way tells you you know
17:10
you’ve you become quite adept at knowing
17:12
what you can cut without offending
17:15
anybody and of course without changing
17:16
the meaning and of course without
17:17
leaving out essential stuff but yeah so
17:20
what’s the worst direction like like if
17:22
going from like Swedish to Chinese or
17:27
something like what’s the that’s what’s
17:29
the most dense language going to the
17:31
most fluffed up for lack of a better
17:33
word you know yeah well I think is
17:36
pretty dense but is there a denser than
17:38
English no I mean in my experience
17:43
English is definitely the most compact
17:47
language that we have to deal with and
17:51
then for sure Arabic has caused us the
17:57
most kind of headaches in terms of that
17:59
extra time needed to save the center to
18:01
get the same content and German
18:04
sometimes we not always but yeah German
18:07
can be pretty tricky it’s like that
18:09
classic joke were someone translates and
18:11
the person speaks for five minutes and
18:13
then the translator said he said yes yes
18:18
yes yeah yeah exactly so it’s a
18:23
challenge but yeah it’s always fun and
18:25
it’s great to be able to give somebody
18:27
back 15 20 languages and and everything
18:31
is just perfectly synced up so I mean
18:33
it’s a good feeling to be able to
18:35
deliver and do I mean right at the
18:38
beginning to be perfectly honest I mean
18:39
years and years and years and years ago
18:41
before we’d kind of got the hang of this
18:43
we used to just say well for the Arabic
18:45
or the German you know the end of this
18:47
sequence you’re just gonna have to have
18:49
a freeze frame for another four seconds
18:52
after all it’s only eLearning if they
18:54
can handle it yeah and that’s what used
18:56
to happen but I mean now I think we’ve
18:58
no not I think for sure we’ve got the
19:00
hang of making the language fit the
19:03
timing do you find they’re either you
19:06
have to use a say resort to time
19:09
stretching or compressing very
19:12
occasionally yeah very occasionally but
19:15
again it’s really fractional um yeah
19:19
it’s funny how some some people can read
19:22
and they can take more time compression
19:24
than other people were it’s very obvious
19:27
that it’s been compressed and other
19:28
people they just so how the way they
19:30
speak and they pronounce it everything
19:32
it compresses and survives that’s that’s
19:36
very true yeah that’s very true yes the
19:39
the the clearer the enunciation of the
19:41
words and the less difference there is
19:45
within a sentence or group of sentences
19:47
because some people do tend to sort of
19:50
suddenly speed up and if you suddenly
19:52
speed up and the rest of the stuff is
19:55
kind of fairly slow yeah
19:56
I’m exaggerating off-course but if that
19:59
is a is a characteristic of obviously
20:04
that does not react well to be speed it
20:07
up you suddenly get this you know it
20:11
makes it more obvious essentially
20:13
exactly yeah yeah yeah yeah so do you
20:16
get into actually dubbing films where
20:20
you know maybe you’re trying to fake
20:22
lip-sync even though it’s a new new
20:23
language but you’re trying to pick
20:26
translations that might work within not
20:29
just the timing but even
20:31
the mouth mouth yeah sure to be honest I
20:35
had my experience with that is almost
20:38
exclusively and not exclusively but
20:41
almost exclusively from Italian but
20:44
other languages into English so I
20:50
personally do almost all of that and
20:55
that is a long job it really really is I
20:59
mean we’ve just done not just one sort
21:03
of six eight months ago we did a film on
21:06
Michelangelo for maybe sky and that went
21:11
when I went out to cinemas last year and
21:14
that was all lipstick it was three
21:17
actors basically and that was a bastard
21:20
it’s good fun but I mean it was it was
21:22
tough lip synching the whole thing
21:26
fortunately there we did it locally so
21:29
basically um I was cast and as
21:32
Michelangelo and the other two people
21:35
were also him to Milan so that was good
21:38
we could do it you know as one normally
21:41
does idea but in other situations we’ve
21:45
linked and what I have always done so
21:50
far hopefully not to the frustration of
21:53
too many the voice talents is I’ve kind
21:55
of whispered in my sink my lip sync just
21:59
to provide a guide also to be honest as
22:01
when you’re doing this adaptation you
22:04
kind of need to say that loud at least
22:07
that’s the way I’ve I’ve found it works
22:09
best so yeah I I always say it out loud
22:13
oh no that doesn’t work let’s try it out
22:15
that oh yeah mmm that’s almost oh okay
22:17
let’s take out that particle there oh
22:19
let’s change to change that verb do it
22:22
again oh yeah that perfect and so I just
22:25
record it even if it’s not me
22:27
I still recorded on the film that I’m
22:30
adapting for lip sync so at the end I’ve
22:33
got the whole thing there
22:34
if the talent wants to hear that and
22:36
especially if it’s just a few lines I
22:38
mean so you do your version of the sync
22:40
so that you can test it find it and then
22:44
talent has something to serve a shadow
22:47
or a scratch track to reference exactly
22:50
so yeah yeah so if you can also hear the
22:53
rhythm obviously I mean if it’s kind of
22:55
supposed to be like that so they if it’s
22:58
kind of supposed to be like that so they
23:00
can get that uh better putter especially
23:04
if they’re dubbing from a language that
23:06
maybe they don’t understand why why do
23:08
you find it useful to whisper it is that
23:11
I just do that so I don’t add my
23:13
interpretation Roop yeah because I think
23:17
that’s a lot of like one of the possible
23:21
problems if the voice director is also a
23:24
talent there’s always the danger I think
23:28
that you you try and get the person to
23:32
do as you do it right your direction
23:35
tends to morph into trying to get
23:38
someone to you know basically to imitate
23:41
how you do it
23:42
so whispering kind of reduces
23:46
considerably yes sure it is literally
23:50
just a rhythmic guide and there’s only
23:53
because maybe you know if it’s a safe
23:56
it’s a one or two liner you can
23:58
certainly let them see the film first of
24:00
in let them leave certainly send the
24:01
film they can see the film but you don’t
24:02
really need a hundred percent to to send
24:09
them that part of the film and then redo
24:11
it and read it always under film once
24:13
once once they know what they’re doing
24:15
they can they can do it wild yeah and
24:18
some some actors work better off of like
24:21
hereit’s say it it’s not always about
24:22
looking at the film I’ve seen I’ve seen
24:24
many times where the film becomes almost
24:26
a distraction yes
24:29
something that over complicates things
24:30
and if you can get the right timing if
24:34
it’s you know if it’s lip sync and you
24:35
have a guide track like you have that
24:38
that may that may be all that’s
24:39
necessary yeah yeah yeah some sometimes
24:42
it really really is absolutely yeah yeah
24:44
yeah I mean it’s great for somebody able
24:46
to see who they are so I mean sure so
24:49
they get an idea of the character
24:50
exactly Authority Cala T as well and
24:54
also their what they’re doing I mean
24:57
yeah the kind of
24:58
that we do as unfortunately we don’t
25:01
have a lot of cinema
25:03
and certainly not not linking not viet
25:07
not you know not with those like remote
25:09
area yeah yes i mean it’s not it’s not a
25:13
common problem for us but anyway being
25:16
able to see who you are and see if
25:19
you’re you know speaking straight to
25:21
camera or you’re kind of turning around
25:23
and doing something else and then coming
25:25
back I mean all that kind of stuff it’s
25:26
certainly good to see it I think it’s
25:28
sometimes a telltale sign when you see
25:31
something that’s dubbed in the dubbing
25:32
is too clean or sometimes some of the
25:37
physical like movements and things that
25:41
might make somebody who knows like out
25:44
of breath or just even some of the
25:47
movements that maybe are captured as
25:48
part of the dialogue and then when it’s
25:50
you know switched out so now that
25:53
original track is gone and the new
25:55
language is in sometimes the issue is
25:57
that the new language is like to clean
25:59
that makes it too obvious that it’s been
26:00
replaced and you don’t show like do do
26:03
the actors have to sometimes get into a
26:05
little bit of movement or whatnot to try
26:08
to you know sell the the new performance
26:11
that it’s absolutely yeah absolutely I
26:15
mean especially in what we know mentally
26:17
doolittle of which is of course cinema
26:19
just in brackets I mean Mussolini banned
26:23
foreign language and so the Italians
26:28
everything was dubbed and yeah there are
26:32
some you now now of course with Netflix
26:34
and and and and Prime and so on people
26:39
are getting more used to looking at
26:40
subtitles than the last five years or so
26:42
I mean I would always watch a Spanish
26:44
film in Spanish with subtitles
26:45
personally because in the UK that that’s
26:48
how I was brought up kind of thing but
26:50
yeah I I certainly appreciate watching
26:52
it in the original language and I don’t
26:54
mind looking at the subtitles because
26:55
that the Italians have had they’re not
26:59
used to it and as I say now now they’re
27:02
getting more used to it for decades
27:04
everything was dubbed absolutely
27:06
everything was dubbed into Italian and
27:07
still is in mainstream TV absolutely
27:10
Aldous
27:12
well it’s a heavenly series brought over
27:15
from the states
27:18
reality TV comedy series crime series
27:23
everything dubbed into Italian sir I
27:25
mean actually the Italians I think
27:27
probably if not the most accomplished
27:32
and others down the world certainly
27:37
although oh you do know about the
27:38
Russian story have you heard this story
27:40
no sir so in in the 80s you know
27:45
American movies were banned but they
27:48
would smuggle them in and the way they
27:50
would do the dubbing is they would
27:52
literally just like whoever smuggled
27:55
these in had a girlfriend who spoke
27:57
English or sorry who spoke English so
28:00
she could understand and they would
28:01
literally just sit there in the theater
28:04
shoot the video off of the screen while
28:08
she listened on headphones and just
28:11
repeated everything back in in in
28:13
Russian oh sure one though was doing the
28:15
whole thing right so she was the voice
28:16
of Rocky
28:17
she was the place of everybody and and
28:20
she’s like a celebrity because all
28:22
Russians like she’s the iconic right
28:25
when it’s amazing it’s simultaneous
28:28
translation yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah I
28:34
think the classic story though is um the
28:36
first Mad Max when it was released in
28:38
America was dubbed it was dubbed by an
28:43
American no Gibson was dubbed by an
28:45
American yeah Wow
28:47
Chaz from access talent was the guy that
28:51
was the agent who who supplied the the
28:54
act of heaven for the Mad Max film and
28:57
we had a conversation about it and the
28:59
guy was with an Australian guy said I’ve
29:01
got a copy of that on VHS and we sent it
29:04
to him right that was in the days when
29:07
no one can understand Australians what’d
29:09
you say I said I live in Austria in your
29:19
studio because we always have to get a
29:20
bit techie what sort of gear have you
29:22
got oh right
29:24
oh this you asking absolutely the wrong
29:26
person stupidly I didn’t ask them to
29:28
make me a list but what’s the badge on
29:31
the microphone you’re talking into
29:32
computers
29:34
but we’re using pretty much Illinois
29:36
Minh Mike’s we’ve not updated completely
29:41
our pro tools yet don’t ask me what
29:42
version we’ve got but we’re not using
29:43
the very latest one because with five
29:46
Studios it comes in at quite a price to
29:49
keep on updating everything um yeah but
29:53
anyway we’re all Pro Tools it’s all pro
29:56
tools everywhere but we’ve also got
29:57
you’ll see use Cubase and logic and
30:00
stuff for the music for the musical
30:02
stuff what else I was finding
30:06
interesting they’re talking about gear
30:07
though how in different countries
30:10
different gear is adopted it’s not a
30:13
general thing I saw a photograph pop up
30:15
on Twitter and it was just um a female
30:18
voice talent who had won an award or
30:20
something I can’t even think what it was
30:21
now but I looked immediately saw the
30:23
photograph went English and the thing
30:25
that gave it away was the only people in
30:27
the world and I’ve got a funny feeling
30:29
you have a pair of these Daniel is the
30:32
BBC style huge white headphones yeah
30:37
that’s right I can’t even think of one
30:39
right now that I saw the point English
30:41
because no one else wears them no you’re
30:44
right
30:44
but because because they’re so closed
30:49
yeah I mean they really really are and
30:53
you really can tell the difference and
30:54
the MIT they maybe they don’t have the
30:56
best sound for you to voice talent in
30:58
your ears I don’t know well though it’s
30:59
pretty damn good
31:00
but they don’t leak so you know you can
31:03
have that film at a certain volume that
31:07
you’re listening to and dubbing over and
31:09
it won’t come out obviously it will a
31:11
certain volume but I mean there’s more
31:13
tolerance for these things do you’re
31:16
right is slightly wearing it they have
31:18
pretty industrial looking and feeling
31:21
but they’re not really cool that is so
31:25
unique and is so English to see those
31:28
headphones I think they’re actually they
31:29
were designed for drummers I think it
31:31
could be wrong but some interest is so
31:34
piqued like I’m trying to figure out
31:35
which ones they are now well if you just
31:37
have a look
31:38
any photographs of the Beatles they used
31:39
to wear them at EMI in London so they’re
31:42
they’re like the little flat ones with
31:43
the round things like they’re like a
31:44
flat rectangle with a round thing in the
31:46
middle Bayer dynamic is that who makes
31:49
them yeah thought they were I’m not sure
31:51
brand they are but they’re they’re huge
31:53
rectangular big like it’s almost like a
31:55
that’s right brick yeah yeah you see
32:01
those all the time but they still make
32:04
those are those just they do still make
32:07
them we have we have we still have all
32:09
the original ones that we got in the
32:10
early 90s we still got them and every
32:13
five or six years we just changed the
32:16
the pad part we’ve just ordered another
32:19
20 or so yeah
32:24
but they just pop out and you pop the
32:25
new ones on once they used to I was
32:28
going home and my girlfriend was saying
32:31
what’s all that black you’ve got on your
32:33
ears so okay yeah that’s that’s what is
32:39
this the the rubber so now we’ve got
32:41
these no other material bit squeakier
32:47
than the rubber but no much yeah yeah oh
32:49
my my oldest headphones and this is a
32:52
thumbs up for ikg there’s a pair of k14
32:55
ones that I got in 1980 well and are
33:00
still going strong perfect in fact they
33:02
did go in one ear but I just everybody
33:05
up off and we just sold it up the the
33:07
wired it snapped off and put them back
33:09
together again bingo
33:10
beautiful hell that’s pretty good that’s
33:12
coming up for 40 years yeah yes so for
33:15
everyone’s curiosity are we talking
33:17
about the beyerdynamic DT 100’s yes oh
33:26
the thing that comes across the top yeah
33:28
and go play football with that yeah it
33:31
looks like your um your cycling helmet
33:33
it’s like you’re in a factory or
33:35
something yeah yeah when you first set
33:39
up the studio I’m always curious about
33:40
this because we talked we spoke to Chris
33:41
Kent I think you probably oh yeah yeah
33:45
and when he set up his studio in London
33:48
I said well how do you go politically
33:50
it’s
33:51
or could being a talent and having a
33:53
studio don’t other studios get their
33:54
nose out of joint and he’s held him ya
33:57
know well I didn’t do that I mean
34:00
there’s the kind of hub the studio hub
34:03
in in Milan is near where the Rye
34:07
Italy’s version of the BBC is and there
34:11
were I don’t know 30 or 40 studios in
34:15
that area and I set mine up in a
34:18
different area on purpose so as not to
34:21
UM tell my the people that have you know
34:24
fed me for 10 years previously that I
34:27
was um kind of starting up in
34:30
competition with them and to be honest I
34:32
mean we do an awful lot of work in the
34:34
education in the language education
34:36
market I would say that well no not I
34:38
would say I know damn well that that is
34:39
like 60% of the stuff we do so we record
34:42
dictionaries for HarperCollins we’ve
34:45
just done one in seven languages we
34:49
record language courses you know the
34:51
monologues and the dialogues for for
34:55
Pierce and for lots and lots of
34:59
different people so I wasn’t really into
35:02
competition and I tried very much I
35:04
didn’t go fishing for the clients that I
35:07
knew I just you know I’ve been recording
35:08
with other people so I think I was very
35:11
diligent about that having said that
35:12
though Andrew you’re absolutely right I
35:15
mean a week after I’d set up my studio
35:17
all of my clients just stopped calling
35:21
me my local clients I mean the local
35:23
studios not going to say that but the
35:25
studios just said oh right that’s that
35:27
so to discourage people also in a way to
35:34
come to me because everybody would
35:35
always go to this other hub and you know
35:37
that all the video post-production
35:39
facilities were in that hub so it always
35:42
made sense for people to do any
35:44
voiceover work there as well they could
35:46
literally walk across the road and go to
35:48
a recording studio and then come back
35:49
again and finish off the video edit and
35:51
more and more companies were setting up
35:55
where they do both video and audio so it
35:57
kind of made sense and we were happy
35:58
doing our language our language course
36:01
and and another stuff although yeah
36:04
so so yeah I lost a lot of clients when
36:07
I when I set up and then 12 years later
36:09
I just decided enough is enough guys
36:12
happy came here to the heart and in said
36:15
applause did you hear
36:16
no they fine with it now there are is is
36:18
still a bit of animals animosity um well
36:21
I mean I’m yeah they’re kind of fine
36:24
with it get him well with everybody I am
36:27
being cold now much more than I was for
36:29
the first five to ten years after its it
36:33
was quite dramatic because I mean I
36:35
would have death thing ever went over 12
36:37
or 13 dubs in a day but there were times
36:42
when I’d leave the taxi running outside
36:43
jump in do the stuff go back get up back
36:45
in the taxi and go somewhere else
36:47
the the eighties really there were like
36:49
that and when I’ve started up I really
36:51
didn’t when I first started up I we had
36:54
one studio and it was mainly for me and
36:56
I didn’t really advertise it and so yes
36:58
it was a bit like risk and said I mean
37:00
it just didn’t didn’t shout about it but
37:01
as soon as we started doing the
37:03
different languages and started to
37:06
market ourselves then that then then it
37:08
and kind of the roof fell in for me as a
37:12
talent here locally but yeah now they’re
37:16
okay yeah now we’ve um kind of shaking
37:20
hands and made up sort of thinking could
37:23
actually talk about that though so do
37:24
your work as a talent has that um
37:26
dropped off dramatically or is it G
37:29
balance it with running networks or how
37:32
does it work now yeah it’s I mean if I
37:34
compare what I do now to what I did in
37:36
the 80s there’s just no comparison to be
37:39
perfectly honest in the 80s I really was
37:41
doing masses of work also because as I
37:45
say that if it was a market thing I mean
37:47
there would either the guy came to your
37:49
studio or the girl or you didn’t get the
37:53
dub I mean no he didn’t get the you know
37:55
you couldn’t do it or you literally just
37:57
crossed your fingers now someone else in
37:58
another country didn’t and sends you the
38:00
audio but again in the 80s and how would
38:02
you send the audio the internet didn’t
38:04
exist I mean it was lit was still really
38:06
was still talking reel-to-reel recording
38:08
and no digital ever every recording
38:11
studio would have you know different
38:13
sized envelopes and packages with their
38:16
logo on it because they’d be sending
38:18
first you know reel to reels and then
38:21
CDs and dats and PETA maxes and whatever
38:25
it was you know you’d actually send them
38:27
by post or by courier to your clients so
38:30
being here in this case in Milan and
38:34
being able to offer you know cut through
38:37
all of that and just go to the studio
38:38
and do it was was was hugely beneficial
38:42
for for them as well for the clients so
38:46
yeah I mean it was in it would be
38:47
impossible I think that anybody to
38:49
maintain that kind of flow work because
38:51
obviously slowly men started fitting up
38:54
with with other with other people that
38:56
were doing doing voiceovers and offering
38:58
the same service and Milan was a fashion
39:02
center there were loads of models
39:03
walking around and so on but and English
39:07
teachers would come to Milan for
39:10
teaching the language schools and
39:11
British Council and what-have-you that
39:14
was pretty much it what do you prefer do
39:16
you prefer being in town or do you
39:18
prefer being a producer oh dear I really
39:22
really like both it’s so good though to
39:26
do the production stuff the the
39:29
producers or the voice directors or
39:32
whatever you want to call them are
39:33
obviously the butt of many greg joke and
39:38
we all know the you know the classic
39:41
going through 25 takes and ending up
39:44
where you’ve started from the guys like
39:46
dad that one and you’re gonna be here
39:49
that’s right that’s not what I started
39:51
with my you know yeah so but I don’t
39:55
know about you Andrew when when I was a
39:59
again a did some things as a theatre
40:03
director and actor and when you’re doing
40:05
the two things together and you’re on
40:07
stage he kind of thinking you know this
40:10
is the one time when there’s not
40:11
somebody offstage saying why don’t you
40:13
do it like this or puff from that but I
40:16
mean just giving you some feedback and I
40:18
find that really really useful it has
40:21
the talent rather than necessarily being
40:23
left there completely to do whatever you
40:25
think is is its most appropriate well
40:28
it’s interesting you should say that
40:29
because you are probably one of the few
40:31
fact
40:31
yeah one of the very few people I work
40:34
with in another country that actually
40:36
jumps on line and directs me normally
40:38
I’m left right here to do my own thing
40:40
sure sure which is great of course cuz I
40:43
mean it but I don’t know how you felt
40:45
about its first time we did it but no no
40:50
I liked like you said like I agree
40:52
completely with you I think it’s um it’s
40:54
always far more beneficial to have
40:56
someone either sitting outside the booth
40:59
or down the line because there’s you
41:02
know you get into it you know it’s like
41:03
you basically humans are lazy so we get
41:06
into a pattern and a rhythm and we just
41:08
churn that out and it’s only yes I’m one
41:11
who’s directing you says well have you
41:12
tried this or why don’t we try it this
41:14
way that it actually gets something much
41:15
better out of you yeah oh yeah yeah yeah
41:17
well that’s good I’m very glad that you
41:19
feel that way I certainly feel that way
41:22
and it’s great being as it had to come
41:23
back to your question it’s actually
41:25
great being on the other end it’s great
41:27
being the having the producers hat on
41:30
because again with that same provider
41:33
that I mentioned before not wanting to
41:35
waste your style onto somebody else but
41:39
yeah obviously you have to come from
41:42
your style because he cannot as part of
41:45
you kind of thing but as you’re not
41:49
actually doing it you can play around a
41:53
little bit then you know go from imagine
41:55
how you do it of course you can’t avoid
41:57
that but also have them have a kind of
42:01
you know a bird’s-eye view of it as well
42:03
and kind of think of different ways of
42:06
doing the same thing I mean I said I
42:08
think that it’s a bit of a challenge and
42:11
but it’s also great and it’s also great
42:12
when you actually in sync with the
42:14
talent you know and some talents don’t
42:17
like me Taunton otherwise you know like
42:22
I said I’ve had it easier or not and
42:23
there’s also there’s other things that
42:25
play depending on your accent then the
42:30
rhythm is completely different that’s
42:31
true though that’s true
42:33
like if you’re American or Australian
42:35
New Zealand English Scottish whorls
42:37
whatever you’re all speaking the same
42:39
language
42:39
but it actually is completely different
42:41
in the in the rhythm of yeah where you
42:43
deliver absolutely phrase
42:45
and inflection um are noticeably
42:49
different yeah I was just thinking of a
42:52
particular thing must have been a couple
42:55
of years ago I was with an American
42:56
talent here in Milan in Chile I just
42:59
noticed a certain point he said well you
43:01
know and we suggest and I said David
43:04
you’ve just said suggests it suggests he
43:10
said well no I think we say suggests in
43:13
American English I’ve kind of said nah
43:15
come on David I’ve watched you know
43:18
hundreds thousands of hours of American
43:20
films have never heard suggesting let’s
43:23
just check it oh my god it is suggest so
43:29
yeah that I mean a lot of my family’s in
43:32
the states I I mean you know no no
43:34
stranger to American English but hey
43:36
sometimes there’s a tiny little thing
43:38
that that can escape you yeah YUM so
43:41
that was a lesson for me have you ever
43:43
said something yeah heard anyone say
43:45
suggest well I I see it as s you and
43:49
then just so the G likes that’s a good
43:52
so asked or I’m not sure I follow
43:57
I’m obviously now super aware of this
43:59
because after embarrassing myself to be
44:03
perfectly honest yeah I hear it all the
44:06
time now
44:07
I suggested it’s the G the first is very
44:11
light I was I was I was um over
44:14
emphasizing it therefore yeah for
44:16
registration but I mean yeah suggest and
44:19
another interesting one in the same
44:21
areas clothes who everyone just has
44:24
clothes yeah oh yeah you know clothes
44:28
there’s a D and then a TA clothes yeah
44:31
actually
44:32
oh one the one that you fury eights me
44:33
if we just wanna is the STS ending which
44:38
is not which is not anything to do with
44:39
wave which part of them how are you from
44:42
that yes some people have real problems
44:45
with that and I do I have a process like
44:47
that I could admit say her name but the
44:49
Beavis one of the BBC pronounces of a
44:52
podcast says if you can hear us on
44:55
little little alert dot podcasts
44:58
and I said well guys I’m listening to
45:00
you yeah or that
45:02
yeah no teapot it sounds like pod car is
45:05
like little little pods
45:07
oh so many words get like little
45:09
syllables dropped off and and people go
45:12
their whole life
45:13
slightly mispronouncing things and not
45:16
realizing it and that everyone knows
45:19
what you mean and in common count
45:21
conversation but then under the
45:23
microscope you like you know that’s a
45:25
funny thing I’ve been saying that wrong
45:26
the whole time yeah don’t say for if
45:29
it’s in a conversational script you’d
45:31
say and for whatever reason bla bla bla
45:34
instead of for whatever reason or an a
45:37
there’s all sometimes there’s no you
45:40
know you can do it either way and it’s
45:41
like what rolls off the tongue better
45:43
but there’s a lot of like for jest like
45:47
for just as a whole word onto itself
45:49
it’s interesting that what you’re saying
45:51
there about
45:52
enunciate in and the fur and the for and
45:57
the because that fur is the the schwa
45:59
sound
46:00
that yeah which we have in father and
46:02
and so on and it’s the most common sound
46:04
actually in the English language that so
46:07
but of course if when you’re doing when
46:11
you’re trying to talk to a global
46:13
audience many of whom are not English
46:17
mother tongue speakers very clear for
46:20
them they are often yes and I mean from
46:24
the first at least 10 or 15 years of my
46:25
experience over here people always
46:27
wanted stuff larger than life so I mean
46:31
it always had to be quite histrionic you
46:33
know it was kind of Shakespeare meets
46:35
the contemporary world kind of thing and
46:38
always you know slower than normal and
46:42
well enunciated so that it can be
46:45
understood by people from anywhere in
46:47
the world you know and so on so and that
46:51
is now completely gone out the window
46:54
luckily but the way that you present in
46:58
an voice a video or something that is
47:01
communicating to people from different
47:02
languages and different cultures and
47:04
different
47:04
yeah with not English mother tongue
47:06
almost always does actually have to be
47:09
not more histrionic
47:12
but enunciated and and pronounced in a
47:15
way that is slightly different from the
47:16
way that you would speak to people with
47:19
your own mother tongue what’s
47:22
interesting is I you know I was gonna
47:24
say when when you have to do stuff
47:26
that’s into English how often is it
47:28
English accent versus American accent
47:31
hahaha
47:32
yeah that’s a good one obviously I’ve
47:34
fought for our pitch for many decades
47:39
especially I mean for stuff coming out
47:42
of Europe and actually going back into
47:44
Europe but if it’s going to the States
47:47
obviously I mean the opposite is true I
47:50
mean sometimes again decades people used
47:54
to say to me currently just do it with a
47:56
mid-atlantic accent or can’t you just
47:59
fake an American accent and I would
48:01
always say and obviously still do know
48:06
what is I remember doing I was you know
48:10
doing an industrial video and they were
48:14
hiring a talent from America and the
48:16
recording studio was in I think it might
48:19
have been Ireland actually so there they
48:21
are an english-speaking country and for
48:24
their product video they wanted an
48:26
American accent because and I and I
48:28
remember asking them and they said in
48:30
general the person the producer was like
48:32
in general there’s a more like high-tech
48:36
the American accent can convey more
48:39
heights whereas the English accent might
48:41
might convey more culture or and and and
48:45
the opposite happens so then we’re doing
48:46
industrial videos and it’s so funny
48:48
because often when you want the sound of
48:50
authority it’s an English accent why
48:54
well as I was explaining to Andrew
48:56
recently I mean at least we always get
48:58
this kind of can you do we always not
49:01
always but we do sometimes still and to
49:03
get this kind of mid-atlantic I just
49:04
don’t want it to British or to Americans
49:06
and now I’m saying well why don’t you
49:07
just have it Australian attacked yeah
49:10
you know yeah people that are non
49:12
English and native speakers if they’re
49:15
unsure of where as coming from you’ve
49:17
you’ve won the battle if you don’t want
49:19
to sound too British or sort of you know
49:20
them obviously with British English I
49:24
mean if you if you sort of go
49:26
the scale and become very RP and sort of
49:28
BBC it sounds a bit like it’s sort of
49:29
1950s newscast or documentary or
49:32
whatever or maybe that you’ve just come
49:35
out of Buckingham Palace and if you
49:37
don’t go to sort of Street is just
49:39
sounds like kind of really funny you
49:41
know whatever so you know there’s no
49:46
real escaping a British accent whatever
49:48
you do and anywhere in puff him in the
49:49
middle it’s not we’re in the middle but
49:50
if you but I mean it’s always gonna be
49:54
recognizably British and whatever doing
49:57
Europeans recognise the subtleties of
49:58
different American accents I mean when
50:00
they say an American it’s like oh you
50:03
can’t get some this country guy or you
50:05
can get someone from Chicago and there’s
50:06
these you know New York there’s so many
50:09
different American accents and then in
50:11
America it’s often that the Midwest and
50:13
the Canadians are deemed as being the
50:16
most neutral yeah I mean I can go down
50:20
south to the right place and it’s
50:21
another language
50:22
sure sure sure sure you know I’m sure
50:26
that Daniel you will remember because
50:29
I’m kind of funny feeling it could be a
50:31
similar vintage back in the days did you
50:35
have you Stillson to Radio Luxembourg
50:36
when you were a kid I did yeah yeah that
50:39
was never an avid listener but I’d yeah
50:41
yeah I did yes and so if you listen to
50:43
Radio Luxembourg back in the maybe late
50:46
60s early 70s
50:48
yeah half those half those people on the
50:51
air were Australians amazed to call that
50:53
Mid Atlantic Oh jet set ads for peter
50:56
stuyvesant cigarettes and all that kind
50:58
of thing but there were a whole bunch of
51:00
Aussies the recite the Yale and
51:03
a Deveraux and all those guys nicked
51:06
eighths and all those characters of what
51:07
you know wandered into the UK yeah well
51:10
they yes is you’ve got a good pedigree
51:12
there yeah but it was failure because
51:14
that that became can you do mid-atlantic
51:16
yeah that’s mid-atlantic that’ll fit and
51:19
it was just a you know a world spoken
51:21
Ozzie I guess yeah yeah sure that’s
51:23
that’s great that’s good so that banks
51:25
up my my theory and and advice to people
51:29
yeah okay so you use that one a lot
51:33
please absolutely by the way I mean if
51:39
anybody wants to
51:39
look more at what we’re doing it’s
51:42
networks Europe net and if we want to
51:45
book Daniel how do we go about that
51:46
oh we just chemical know my personal
51:51
website is Daniel Richards dot TV it was
51:54
the only one that still had a Daniel
51:55
Richard so yeah that’s that’s excellent
52:02
thank you so much thanks again I think I
52:05
Milan you lucky devil
52:08
yeah it’s becoming really nice I must
52:10
say yeah yeah it’s a beautifully pray
52:12
and kind of northern European Central
52:15
Europe in whatever no not in European
52:17
kind of not grimy but sort of very
52:20
workaholic place that’s become really um
52:23
it’s very much on the stop on the
52:26
tourist itinerary so it’s full of
52:28
tourists now it’s really striking
52:30
shopping 30 25 30 years ago you know the
52:34
the Cathedral Square was just abandoned
52:37
a completely empty most of the day now
52:40
you can hardly get you have to kind of
52:42
you know the elbow your way through it
52:44
these days yeah yeah no no it’s
52:47
absolutely booming and loads of new
52:49
restaurants and night sports and cool
52:53
museums and exhibitions and stuff to do
52:55
I mean it really is it’s buzzing now
52:58
it’s it’s great it’s been being fun
53:00
watching and being part of not being
53:03
Pope yeah me being being here for that
53:05
transformation because it really really
53:06
is very very noticeable so yeah drop I
53:11
yeah I was there in first time I went to
53:14
Milan was 1986 and I met it was actually
53:19
when Chernobyl went up all right so
53:21
we’re all there in Italy we felt we
53:24
actually wasn’t in Milan when we found
53:26
out I think we just gone to Rome and
53:28
then the knees broke but it obviously
53:30
been up weeks before anyone knew and
53:33
yeah so we scattered and because what
53:37
everyone thought the cloud was heading
53:38
south as it turned out it wasn’t heading
53:41
south it was heading west so you know a
53:43
couple of us we flew back to the UK and
53:46
set up to thicken nuclear cloud we’re
53:49
happy about that or radioactive cloud
53:51
I’m still here though
53:53
yes right you know Oh Oh all your your
53:56
your extra fingers and everything yep
53:59
I’ll get ahead like a cactus but apart
54:00
from that everything’s TV good acting
54:02
pretty pers but we don’t hear very much
54:04
need yeah let’s say thank God for that
54:09
have a great rest of your day
54:12
night that was the pro audio suite if
54:17
you have any questions or ideas for a
54:19
show let us know via our Facebook the
54:22
pro audio suite podcast
54:28
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